Doppelbock

Glassware: Updated pokal
  • Germany
  • Lager
  • ABV = 7.0 – 10.0% (Elevated to high)^
  • IBU = 16-26
  • SRM = 6-25
A very strong, rich, and malt-forward German lager that can have both pale and dark versions. Dark versions have more richly-developed malt flavours, while pale versions are drier, hoppier and more bitter.

Pale versions can be thought of as a stronger, richer, more full-bodied Helles Bock.

Appearance:

  • Colour^ = Gold to brown
  • Clarity = Good

Key Aromas & Flavours:

Aroma
  • Malt = High; malty rich, toasty, light caramel (Optional: moderate malt-derived dark fruit character and low chocolate-like aroma possible in dark versions)
  • Yeast = None (clean)
  • Hops = None to low; floral, spicy or herbal, if present (more is acceptable in pale versions)
  • Other = Moderate alcohol aroma may be present
Flavour
  • Malt = High; malty rich, toasty (Optional: moderate malt-derived dark fruit character and low chocolate flavour possible in dark versions)
  • Yeast = None (clean)
  • Hops = None to low; floral, spicy or herbal, if present (more is acceptable in pale versions)
  • Perceived Bitterness^ = Low
  • Other = Low to moderate alcohol
  • Balance = Towards the malt
Aftertaste/Finish

Fairly malty-sweet from the low hopping rate. Pale versions generally have a drier finish.

Mouthfeel:

  • Body = Full
  • Carbonation = Medium
  • Alcohol warmth = A light alcohol warmth may be noted, but should never burn

Characteristic Ingredients/Processes:

  • Malt = Pils and/or Vienna malt for pale versions; Munich and Vienna malts for dark versions, may use some darker malts for colour adjustment
  • Yeast = German lager yeast
  • Hops = German hop varietals
  • Process = Decoction mash is traditional

Historical Development:

A Bavarian specialty first brewed in Munich by the monks of St. Francis of Paula, today known as Paulaner Brewery. Historically considered “liquid bread” by the monks. The term dopple, or “double”, bock was coined by Munich consumers. Traditionally dark in colour; pale versions are a more recent development.


Commercial Examples:

Dark: Paulaner Salvator, Ayinger Celebrator; Pale: Plank Bavarian Heller Doppelbock


^Sourced from the Cicerone Certification Program’s International Certified Beer Server Syllabus.
All other information is sourced from the BJCP 2015 Style Guidelines.


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